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Program Details

Faculty : Faculty of Engineering & Technology

Program Name : Bachelor of Science (Urban and Regional Planning)

BGCSE Points(or similar) : 40


Type : Under Graduate

No. of Semesters : 10

Description : For direct entry (senior secondary school leavers): apply for entry to BSC230 (Bachelor of Science) or BAS240 (Bachelor of Social Sciences). Entry into BSC290 requires successful completion of Level 100 in either BSC230 or BAS240 Admission to the Degree programme shall be as stipulated in General Academic Regulation 20.20 Applicants for admission to level 100 must have a minimum Grade of C in English Language, Mathematics, and Geography. Preference will be given to candidates with a minimum of grade C in Art or Design and Technology. Students will upon successful completion of Level 400 (spatial) be awarded Bachelor of Science in Urban and Regional Planning (BScURP), and will have an option to pursue Level 500 (specialist), of which upon successful completion, will be awarded Master of Arts Professional Degree in Urban and Regional Planning (MAURP). Applicants with a BScURP or equivalent with a minimum GPA of 3.0may be admitted into Level 500 of the provisionally accredited degree programme by the Royal Town Planning Institute, UK. (http://www.rtpi.org.uk/item/3779/23/5/3) Programme Structure The programme is structured as follows: • 1 year of preparatory pre-plan component with selection of cognate subjects that will lead to a smooth transition from preparatory to planning studies. • 3 years of professional planning studies designated as spatial planning component. •1 year of professional planning studies designated as specialist planning component.

Courses involved :

Semester 1

Core Courses

  INTRO TO COMMN & ACADEMIC LITERACY(ENG & TEC) Credits : 3
  BASIC MICROECONOMICS Credits : 3
  INTRO. TO PHYSICAL & HUMAN ENVIRONMENTS I Credits : 2
  COMPUTER SKILLS FUNDAMENTALS I Credits : 2
  MATHEMATICS FOR SOCIAL SCIENCES I Credits : 3
  INTRODUCTION TO PLANNING & BUILT ENVIRONMENT Credits : 3
  Course Description :Introduction to Planning and Built Environment. Introduction to Planning and the Built Environment offers an introduction to the complexities of contemporary planning. The course will open with a discourse on the diverse and sometimes conflicting definitions of planning. It will then proceed on a journey through the dynamic sub-discipline foci encompassed in planning theory and practice. The course content will draw from both practice and theory, bringing the two together by way of lectures, seminars, a field trip, guest speakers and varied assessment. This journey will conclude with a return to the fundamental questions raised at the start of course – that of the conflicting definitions of contemporary planning.

Optional Courses

    No Optional courses present in this Program for Semester 1.

Elective Courses

    No Elective courses present in this Program for Semester 1.

Semester 2

Core Courses

  ACADEMIC & PROFESSIONAL COMMN (ENG. & TECH.) Credits : 3
  BASIC MACRO ECONOMICS Credits : 3
  INTRO. TO PHYSICAL AND HUMAN ENVIRONMENTS II Credits : 2
  COMPUTER SKILLS FUNDAMENTALS 2 INFORMATION SKILLS 11 Credits : 2
  MATHEMATICS FOR BUSINESS & SOCIAL SCIENCES II Credits : 3
  HISTORY OF PLANNING Credits : 3
  Course Description :

All settlements display various degrees of forethought and conscious design in their layout and functioning. The building and the planning of settlements has a long and
complex history. However, planning as an organised profession has existed for less than two centuries.

Optional Courses

    No Optional courses present in this Program for Semester 2.

Elective Courses

    No Elective courses present in this Program for Semester 2.

Semester 3

Core Courses

  PRINCIPLES OF CARTOGRAPHY Credits : 3
  PLANNING THEORY I Credits : 3
  Course Description :Introduction to Planning Theory: what is Planning? What is theory? Object of Planning Theory; Rational Comprehensive Tradition. Urban Master Planning tradition and its critics; Disjointed Incrementalism: Urban development tradition and Action planning Advocacy Planning : the participatory planning tradition- community action planning.
  PLANNING GRAPHICS & COMMUNICATIONS Credits : 4
  Course Description :

Description, use and care of equipment . Line drawing –pencil and ink. Lettering – freehand, guided and transfer letters. Colouring and shading – pencil, ink, magic markers andtransfer tones/shades. Graphical language, presentations and exhibitions. Scales – scale formula, application of formula, types of scales (linear, fraction, statement, ratio etc). Scale change and conversion. Measurements – straight and other distances; and area measurements at various scales. Projections - orthographic (plan, sections and elevations), isometric, axonometric and perspectives. Measured drawing exercise.

  PLANNING METHODS & TECHNIQUES Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Sources of data for planning, analysis of data, projections for various land use requirements/activities, plan Evaluation, plan Implementation and monitoring. Data Collection Techniques - direct and indirect methods. Data analysis methods – classification, sampling, graphical methods, Models. Forecasting Techniques – aggregate forecasting, composite forecasting, normative forecasting, poPITPtion forecasting, Housing and employment forecasting. Plan preparation – alternative development scenarios. Evaluation Techniques - partial evaluation, comprehensive evaluation. Presentation Techniques. Techniques for plan implementation.

Optional Courses

  COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING Credits : 2
  Course Description :

Introduction to computers and two drafting tools: Arch-Cad and Auto-Cad. This course involves four lectures followed by extensive exercise and application of exercises in the use of two architectural drafting tools.


Pre-req.: GEC121 and GEC122, ARB111 and ARB121


Credits: 2


Lectures/Studio: 2 hours per week

Continuous assessment: Interim assessments


Final examination: Assessment of major design project


CA/Exam ratio: 2:3

  LAND ECONOMICS I Credits : 3
  Course Description :

The course covers major aspects of land as an economic resource. The objective is to teach students the processes of land market and resource allocation in an economy. Concepts of economics introduced in Year I are, in this course related to real property.

Elective Courses

    No Elective courses present in this Program for Semester 3.

Semester 4

Core Courses

  SITE PLANNING & DESIGN I Credits : 4
  Course Description :

Processes and tools: land and society, land planning and design, spatial information and mapping. Site selection and programming: land valuation, site selection context, site selection factors, site alternatives, programming methods, programming documentation. Site inventory and analysis: physical attributes, biological attributes, cultural attributes, integration and synthesis. Design and implementation: concept development,project components, concept evaluation, design development and implementation.

  PLANNING THEORY II Credits : 3
  GIS FOR PLANNERS Credits : 3
  Course Description :

During internship the students should be able to collect basic data, analyse data, prepare base maps, update maps and prepare simple layouts.

  PLANNING PRACTICE/INTERNSHIP I Credits : 4

Optional Courses

  LAND ECONOMICS II Credits : 3
  Course Description :

The course examines theories propounded on distribution of urban land uses as well as the evolution and growth of urban areas. It is meant to develop students understanding of the factors, which influence the growth of urban areas and the problems that accompany them.

  REMOTE SENSING FOR PLANNERS Credits : 3

Elective Courses

    No Elective courses present in this Program for Semester 4.

Semester 5

Core Courses

  PLANNING PRACTICE Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Introduction and overview of professional planning practice. Quality urban planning and project management: what works, what doesn’t. Understanding the entrepreneurial ethics and processes. Challenge and creativity in post-modern planning. The market place and changing demands of effective planning practice. The public image and the ‘leadership’ role of the planner. Marketing your services and products. Project presentation and review procedures. Communication, negotiation and presentations. Staying ahead.

  TRANSPORTATION PLANNING & MANAGEMENT Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Transportation system objectives and constraints, modes of transportation, institutional structure, Transportation system issues and challenges, traffic congestion, traffic safety, equality of access, environmental protection, funding, environmental protection, Transportation planning, perspectives on the planning process, planning regulations, transportation and air quality planning, planning studies, planning studyorganisation, Transportation demand analysis, travel behaviour travel demand modelling, trip generation models, trip distribution models, mode choice models, trip assignment models, Transit Operations, route planning, route location, stop location, route schedules, Transportation project evaluation, economic evaluation techniques, environmental impact assessment.


  ENVIRONMENTAL LAND USE PLANNING Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Introduction to Environmental Planning: Issues of Environmental Concern; Sustainability and Sustainable development; The Nature of Planning; The Environmental Planning Process; Striking a Balance. Perspectives on Environmental Planning: Two integrating Perspectives – Natural Resources and Environmental systems; The Scientific Perspective; The Social Scientific Perspective; Foundations of Environmental Planning: Legal; Economic; Ethical; Ecological. Planning and Managing the Natural Resource Base: The Changing Countryside; Productive uses of rural resources; Mineral Resources. Rural Environmental Planning: Principles of Landscape Ecology; Environmental Planning and the Countryside; Landscape and Nature; Planning Catchments and Rivers; Recreation Ecology; Natural Resource Management Plans. Urban Environmental Planning: Urban Growth and its Management; Managing Demand; Shelter and Urban Form; Energy; Managing Waste and Recycling Land; Traffic and Transport; Nature in the City; Industrial Ecology.

  SITE PLANNING AND DESIGN II Credits : 4
  Course Description :

Definition of site planning: basic principles of plot layout. Energy and resource efficiency. Landscape and microclimate. Town Planning Standards. Design Codes. Concept planning and design development; site planning/development process; Site systems; Site planning and design and sustainability issues. Design rationale (s). Bubble diagrams. Design alternatives. Evaluation of Design alternatives. Preliminary design. Final design. Implementation tools. Development Control (Residential, Industrial, Commercial, Civic and Community, Recreational, mixed land use, etc.). Accessibility, circulation and parking.

Optional Courses

  PLANNING LAW Credits : 3
  Course Description :

The objective of the course is to give students an understanding of planning law and other legislation governing land use planning in Botswana.

  FACILITIES AND SERVICES PLANNING Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Definition of public and community facilities and services vis a vis commercial and private facilities; Characteristics of public/community facilities; Type, design and location requirements for educational facilities; Characteristics and design considerations for health facilities; Recreational facilities ( passive and active recreation, green areas and open spaces, parks, sports grounds and stadiums, indoor and outdoor facilities); Cultural and religious facilities – churches, libraries; Security facilities – fire halls, police stations; Public services – post offices, phone and telecommunication facilities, etc.

Elective Courses

    No Elective courses present in this Program for Semester 5.

Semester 6

Core Courses

  URBAN AND REGIONAL ECONOMICS Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Topics include models and techniques for describing and evaluating urban economies; central place theory, agglomeration economies, urban land use models, intra-urban location models, development strategies and tools; commercial, industrial, and housing development; and problems of poverty and housing. In addition the course covers This course includes the following topics: comparative costs vs. comparative advantage, location analysis for industry, various indices of location measures, land use theories, interregional labour migration, gravity model, interregional trade, regional development, regional equilibrium analysis, export base multiplier, locational quotient, shift share techniques, regional and interregional input-output analysis, and econometric models for regional analysis.

  NEIGHBOURHOOD PLANNING & DESIGN Credits : 4
  Course Description :

Definitions and Perceptions of Urban Design; Urban Design Approaches; Current Issues of Urban Design; Urban Design User Requirements; The Concept of Neighbourhood; Neighbourhood Development; Layout Planning Concerns; Layout Planning Principles and Guidelines; Designing with Nature.

  INFRASTRUCTURE PLANNING & MANAGEMENT Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Definitions, reasons for studying infrastructure planning, role of physical planner, infrastructure and public health linkages, infrastructure and shelter linkages; onsite excreta disposal systems, offsite excreta disposal systems; wastewater technology; solid waste management; storm water management; water demand supply and distribution; power demand, supply and distribution; Telecommunication infrastructure. Financing and cost recovery of sanitation, wastewater, solid waste, power and water supply services.

  PLANNING PRACTICE/INTERNSHIP II Credits : 3
  Course Description :

The planning profession, Town Planning Associations and professional ethics. Managing the planning process. Planning and equal opportunities. Current issues in planning practice. Development control and Development plan exercises comprising the preparation of committee reports and appeals statements. Communications and presentations. Course is also expected to cover transportation data collection, analysis, traffic forecasting, evaluation of transportation and finally transport management.

Optional Courses

  LAND AND ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Credits : 3
  FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Credits : 3
  Course Description :

The course provides students with the basic foundation of facilities management in terms of building performance; legal framework regarding facilities management and property management; management skills; facility planning; building services management and maintenance.

Elective Courses

    No Elective courses present in this Program for Semester 6.

Semester 7

Core Courses

  PLANNING LEGISLATION Credits : 3
  Course Description :

History of planning law will be studied and particularly the British type of legislation that influenced planning here in Botswana. The relevance of the Town and Country Planning Act of 1977, Urban Development Standards 1992, the Development Control Code 1995 and Physical Planning policies within the contemporary planning framework. How efficient are the planning law organisations; It explores the relationship between the planning legislation and other aunxillary statutes that have a bearing on land use planning, development, environmental concerns and land management’s namely Environmental Impact Assessment Bill, the Building Control Act, land Survey Act and the Tribal land Act. Existing and potential conflicts would be identified between the Town and Country Planning Act and the above mentioned statutes and suggestions in class as amelioration measures.

  PLANNING & MANAGEMENT FOR CLIMATE CHANGE Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Overview of land and property development process. Feasibility and site analysis (allowable use of site, site analysis and site selection, rezoning). Conceptual design; Schematic design (base map preparation, refinement of previous assumptions). Final design (suburban street design, storm drainage design, design of storm water management facilities, floodplain studies, grading and earthwork, wastewater collection, water distribution, wastewater treatment, water supply and treatment, erosion and sediment control, contract documents and specifications, construction cost estimating). Plan submission and permitting (subdivision submissions, plan submissions, review and approval process, environmental permits, etc.). Construction (construction stakeout surveys, building permits, certificates of occupancy, etc.).

  URBAN REGENERATION & RENEWAL Credits : 4
  Course Description :

The ways of determining regions and types of Regions in Botswana. Reasons for developed and under-developed regions globally; Core Periphery models, growth pole and cumulative causation and concepts such as multiplier effects, economies of scale are discussed etc; Sector Theory, aligning of stages of Sector theory to various economic situations; General discussion of Economic Base Theory and discussion of its three techniques basic (Location Quotient, Minimum Requirement and Assumption approaches); roles Regional/District institutions ; Review or the Rural Development policy and National Settlement Policy and their related strategies. Critical review of the settlement strategy where it has been applied globally and in particular in the Sub-Saharan Africa

  GENDER AND PLANNING Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Classification of settlements; Need for urban renewal and settlement upgrading; Slums – causes and effects; advantages and disadvantages of slum clearance; in situ upgrading of slums: theory and practices, advantages and disadvantages; public participation in urban renewal settlement upgrading; building partnerships with private sector and communities. Plot regularization and service provision; private, community and state partnerships in regeneration and renewal.

Optional Courses

  PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT & FINANCE Credits : 3
  Course Description :

The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of why people invest in landed properties and how they make such investment decision. The course will cover in detail the various stages and requirements in the property development process, its economic context and alternative sources of funding. It will also outline different types of risks investors have to contend with and the available techniques in assessing the risks.

  LAND & PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT Credits : 3
  Course Description :

The course will explore ‘gender’ as an analytical tool and a proxy for decision making and accessing resources; gender roles, contracts and relationships in society; Gender analysis, auditing, mainstreaming and proofing; Gendered domestic and public spaces; Gendered inequalities and social exclusion; Urbanisation (modernisation) and women’s empowerment; and approaches for mainstreaming and promoting women’s participation in development planning.

Elective Courses

    No Elective courses present in this Program for Semester 7.

Semester 8

Core Courses

  CONTRACTING & PLANNING PROJECT MANAGEMENT Credits : 3
  Course Description :

The course enables physical planners to appreciate the links between planning decisions and property values and the extent to which planning processes may negatively or positively affect value of development. In addition, compensation needs tend to influence land use planning decisions.

  PLANNING IMPLEMENTATION TECHNIQUES Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Contracting: initiating an urban (land development) project, preparing a detailed project brief and ToR, ToR submission, project management/organising people. Introduction to planning project management: professional development, what is project management, planning staff, motivation, planning managers. The process of project management: the project management life cycle, the work cycle, the business context, building the business case. Case studies and Perspectives: local, regional and international case studies; perspectives.

  PLANNING ETHICS Credits : 3
  Course Description :

The natures of urban governance, and urban governance. History of urban governance in Botswana and elsewhere. Overview of trends in urban governance in Botswana and elsewhere. Actors in urban governance: citizens and electors; municipal employees; elected officials; senior governments and special interests. Issues in urban governance: finances; land-use planning; transport and other infrastructure; economic and social development; energy and environment. Prospects for the future of urban governance. Intersecting these topics will be several critical matters including size of the municipality, governmental framework (e.g., singletier, two-tier), involvement of municipal agencies, and societal/economic context (e.g., command vs. market economy; rich vs.poor). Theoretical content will be introduced as appropriate but will not be emphasized.

  URBAN GOVERNANCE & MANAGEMENT Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Introduction to plan implementation: importance, timing, stakeholders, roles and responsibilities; Implementation techniques categories: nonregulatory (special purpose planning, education, planning or zoning administrator hiring, etc.), regulatory (zoning, land division and sub division control, site plan review, design standards, performance standards, etc.), voluntary (conservation easement, purchase of development rights, donation of land, etc.), incentive based (transfer of development rights, density bonus, tax increment financing, tax incentives, revenue sharing, etc.). Controlling growth using Smart code: the nature and role of code, form based code, transect-based code; Monitoring: programmes and projects impacts, strengths, weaknesses, budgeting and review.

Optional Courses

  PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Credits : 3
  Course Description :

This course provides and equips students with the general principles, knowledge and skills of the practice of estate management, including basics of estate management such as key elements of leases, types of estate management and duties and roles of property managers. It deals with systems of property management; estate policy formulation and estate accounts.

  URBAN AGRICULTURE Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Introduction to the concept of “Professional Code of Ethics”. History of Planning Ethics. Principles to which Planners Aspire. The Overall Responsibility to the Public. Responsibility to clients and Employers. Responsibility to the Profession and Colleagues. The Rules of Conduct. Sanction for non-adherence to the Code.

Elective Courses

    No Elective courses present in this Program for Semester 8.

Semester 9

Core Courses

  RESEARCH METHODS & TECHNIQUES Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Major research approaches: Objectivity, Positivism, Postmodernism and empiricism etc. Values and ethics in research. Research design; identification and conceptualization of the research problem. Quantitative and qualitative data collection tools: questionnaire, structured/ semi-structured questionnaires. Sampling – random sampling, purposeful sampling, ‘snowball sampling’ etc. Methods for qualitative data collection: participatory and non-participatory approaches; Data analysis – SPSS and other statistical packages . Triangulation and issues of data validity and reliability. (For all 3 specialist streams A,B and C)

  NEW URBANISM Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Architectural Styles and Building Types, Land Development, Parking, Health and Aging, and Landscape Design, and revised chapters on Principles, Shaping the Region, New Urbanism in the New Millennium, Revitalizing Cities and Towns, Urban Retail, The Human-Scale Workplace, Planning and Transit, Streets, Civic Building and Spaces, Codes, Legal Issues, Charrettes, Finding the Market, Finance, Building, Affordable Placemaking, Marketing, Building Community, Environment, and Policy, and New Urbanism Abroad. Advanced criticism of the following major actors and ideas in contemporary architecture and urbanism, - le Corbusier, L. I. Kahn, Robert Venturi, Postmodernism, James Stirling, Leon Krier, the Garden City, Conservation and Historic Reconstruction, Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater- Zyberk, Hank Dittman, Green Urbanism/Eco-City, Critical regionalism, Sustainability, Transit-oriented Development, Selected Developments in Southern Africa and beyond.

  LANDSCAPE PLANNING & DESIGN Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Background information: Definitional issues in Landscape design and planning, historical perspective of landscape design and planning; Urban Planning and landscape planning and design. Landscape design: An overview of the landscape design process; How to read architects and engineers drawings; Soft and hard landscape, external furniture; Barriers, study of flora of Botswana, Climatic design and energy efficiency in landscape design, Landscape design and management in semi arid environments. Landscape planning: Landscape planning and City form, Environmental inventory and site assessment, sustainability planning and landscape ecology; hazard assessment and risk management, special environments, restoration, facility planning, master planning and management planning.

  INTEGRATED HOUSING STUDIES Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Housing: a beyond shelter definition. Effects of social exclusion and unequal access to adequate housing. Housing and the sustainable livelihoods framework. Role of housing in socioeconomic development. Employment from housing and related sectors. Overcoming gender, behavioural, occupational, social, cultural and legal barriers to house ownership. Empowering youths, women and the poor through on job training and skills development in housing. Towards a partnership between the state, private sector and local communities. Sustainable housing design, finances, construction and maintenance. Review of ‘best practice’ cases.

  INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLANNING Credits : 3
  Course Description :

The Concept and Theory of integrated development planning.

Principles of Development Planning. The process of preparing an integrated development plan. Analysis (survey, analysis of issues and forecasting the future and plan making). The impact and policy implications of the concepts of “integrated sustainable development” and “sustainable human settlements” for a municipal/local area. The legal implications and principles of the concepts of “developmental local government” and `integrated development planning` for governance in a municipal/local area. Institutional capacity in Integrated Development Planning (IDP) processes. Implementation techniques of IDPs

  REGIONAL & RURAL PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT Credits : 3
  Course Description :

This course provides guidance for spatial planners on how to meet the economic, social and environmental challenges that climate change raises for urban and regional development. It brings together some of the recent research and scholarly ideas on the role of spatial planning in combating climate change. It addresses both mitigation measures for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adaptation to the effects of climate change. It provides an overview of emerging practice, with analysis of the drivers of policy change and practical implementation of mitigation measures, plans, designs, programmes and strategies. It scopes planning issues and opportunities at different spatial scales, drawing on both the African and international experiences and highlighting the need to link global and local responses to shared risks and opportunities.

  COMPARATIVE PLANNING Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Emergence and diffusion of contemporary spatial planning. Indigenous planning. Contested and negotiated planning imposition. Adjusted, modified and invented planning. Undiluted and selective planning borrowing. Typologies of planning systems. Types of spatial planners. The variety of planning cultures. Review of planning systems in developed and developing world. The governance of spatial planning. towards a global planning culture.

  PLANNING SUPPORT SYSTEMS Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Overview and historical development of DIA. The DIA current practice and usage, the DIA decision making process, and how to develop an effective DIA team. The weaknesses in the existing DIA process, and its likely future development. DIA scoping, information gathering and assimilation and technical report writing. Identification of project characteristics, prediction of impacts and significance assessment. Available mitigation techniques. are available. Participation in a site visit and studying of reallife- case studies Review DIA statements and DIA post-auditing and developmental management methods.

  DEVELOPMENT IMPACT ANALYSIS Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Public Participation defined- rationale for participation- Sherry Arnstein’s Ladder of Citizen Participation and adaptations; Theoretical basis for participation- Good Governance Model-liberal democratic basis- governance debate: Participation as a Right, International conventions and participation: Agenda 21, ILO Convention 169, Rights Based Approaches ; Methods of eliciting Participation in Physical Planning, Participatory approaches- Participatory Appraisal – PRA RRAapplication to urban planning- physical planning- Community Action Planning, NGOs, CBOs and civil society organisations as agents of participation; Limits to Community Participation: State-Civil society relations in Botswana- Information sharing and dissemination.

  PUBLIC PARTICIPATION & NEGOTIATION TECHNIQUES Credits : 3
  Course Description :

General principles: agendas, commitments, transparency, process ownerships, initiatives, context, facilitation, etc. Methods: action planning, workshops and schemes, forums, gaming, charrettes, reviews, reconnaissance trips, task forces, user groups, soap boxes, environment shops, etc. Scenarios: community centre, derelict sites, new and old neighbourhoods, regeneration areas, village revival, heritage sites, environmental art projects, inner city, industrial districts, etc. Formats and checklists: strategy & workshop planner, action planning, progress monitoring, evaluations, equipment and supplies, initiatives, etc.

Optional Courses

  ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT Credits : 3
  HEALTHY CITY PLANNING Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Healthy City Planning explores the link between urban planning and health.

This is traced to the public health origins of urban planning which somehow got overshadowed by other planning concerns. The incidence of diseases in cities in developing countries provides a challenge to which urban planning has to respond.

  ADMINISTRATIVE & POLICY PLANNING Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Introduction to Public Policy and Administrative Governance. Public Bureaucracy in Theory and Practice. Policy Formation: The Institutions and Processes of Political Governance. Administrative Governance: The Challenge of Policy Implementation. The Role and Influence of Nonstate Actors in Policymaking and Administrative Governances. Ethics in Administrative Governance: The Challenge of Ensuring Democratic Accountability in Public Administration. Social Diversity and the Question of “Difference” in Policymaking and Administrative Governance. Paradigms of Governance: Policy-making and Administrative Governance from the Administrative Welfare State to the Neo-liberal Stat.

  SMART GROWTH PLANNING Credits : 3
  Course Description :

Introduction of PSS concept: PSS systems progress, predictions & speculations; planning movements, concept of planner’s tool box of digital tools and applications; visualization and spatial decision making; The Regional Scale: cellular urban modeling; simulating regional futures; What If? A new tool for new planning; Moving from Region to City: an overview of UrbanSim; Community Viz; INDEX; PSS in practice: planner’s perspective; what planners can achieve with PSS.

  COMMUNITY PLANNING METHODS & SCENARIOS Credits : 3
  Course Description :

It should based on selected topic from A, B, or C. specialist’s streams. It should be of a standard that merits publication. How to develop a research proposal into a dissertation will include: proposition, contextual review and bibliography, strategy, specific data gathering, analysis, alternatives, proposal selection, conclusion, implementation, self-evaluation, compilation and editing, organisation of dissertation and writing/ prose style.

  URBAN ECOLOGICAL FOOTPRINT METHODS Credits : 3

Elective Courses

    No Elective courses present in this Program for Semester 9.

Semester 10

Core Courses

  BUILDING TECHNOLOGY AND MATERIALS Credits : 2

Optional Courses

    No Optional courses present in this Program for Semester 10.

Elective Courses

    No Elective courses present in this Program for Semester 10.
Contact Details :
4775 Notwane Rd. Gaborone, Botswana Private Bag UB 0022. Tel: +(267) 355 0000 Gaborone, Botswana