Chemistry Department Handbook

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CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT

UNIVERSITY OF BOTSWANA

HANDBOOK 2015-2016

 

 

 

       
    Description: Libraryex
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Compiled by

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr R Mapitse (HOD)

and Dr G Kumar

 

 

Department of Chemistry, Private Bag UB 00704, Gaborone

 

 

 

 

 

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Foreword

3

Chapter

 

 

1.0

Introduction

5

1.4

Career opportunities in Chemistry

6

2.0

Qualification Titles

9

3.0

Programme Objectives

9

4.0

Requirements For Progression into Undergraduate Chemistry Programmes

9

5.0

Assessments and Examinations

9

6.0

Programme Outline/Structures

10

6.1.0

Undergraduate Programmes

10

6.1.1

Common First Year Programme

10

6.1.2

The Single Major Programmme

10

6.1.3

The Chemistry Major, Second Science Subject Major or Minor Programmme

10

 

6.1.4

The Chemistry Minor Progamme

10

6.1.5

Entry Requirements

10

6.2

Undergraduate Courses Offered in Different Semesters

11

6.2.1

Assessment and Examinations

18

6.2.2

Progression from one semester to the next semester

18

6.2.3

Award of Degree

18

6.3

Graduate Degree Porgrammes in Chemistry

20

6.3.1

General Provisions

21

6.3.2

Qualification Titles

21

6.3.3

Programme Objectives

22

6.4

Departmental Regulations for the Master of Science Degree

22

6.4.1

Entrance Requirements

22

6.4.2

Programme Structure

22

6.4.2.1

The Master of Science

22

6.5

Regulations for the M Phil and PhD Programme

23

6.5.1

Entrance Requirements

23

6.5.2

Programme Structure

23

6.5.2.1

M Phil and PhD

23

6.5.2.3

Transfer of Registration

24

6.5.3

Course Listings – Master of Science Common Core Courses

25

6.5.4

Analytical Chemistry Core Courses

25

6.5.4.1

Optional Courses

25

6.5.5

Inorganic Chemistry Core and Optional Courses

25

6.5.6

Organic Chemistry Core Courses

25

6.5.6.1

Optional Courses

26

6.5.7

Physical Chemistry Core Courses

26

6.5.7.1

Optional Courses

26

6.6

M Phil and PhD Courses

26

6.7

Dissertation and Thesis

26

6.8

Assessment and Examination

27

7.0

Course takings

27

7.1

Semester I

27

7.1.1

Undergraduate

27

7.1.2

Graduate

28

7.2

Semester II

29

7.2.1

Undergraduate

29

7.2.2

Graduate

30

8.0

Course Descriptions

31

8.1

Year I

31

8.2

Year II

34

8.3

Year III

42

8.4

Year IV

53

9.0

M Sc Courses

67

9.1

Analytical Chemistry

67

9.2

Inorganic Chemistry Courses

76

9.3

Organic Chemistry Courses

83

9.4

Physical Chemistry Courses

92

9.5

Literature Survey Courses

98

10.0

Research Currently Undertaken in the Department

100

11.0

Contact Details of Staff and Students

101

11.1

Secretarial Staff

101

11.2

Academic Staff

101

11.3

Technical Staff

102

11.4

Demonstrators

103

11.5

List of Current Graduate Students – August 2012

103

           

FOREWORD

 

Chemistry, central to most fields of science, helps us to understand a range of topics including environmental issues, drugs and medicine, production of industrial materials such as plastics and nutrition. In the recent past chemistry has been called to fore in public health where food safety may be compromised. There is a great demand for chemists in many industries and government agencies. In fact, the chemical industry in Botswana is a steadily growing

 

At the University of Botswana (UB), we focus on providing truly excellent undergraduate and graduate programs while carrying out innovative chemical research. The department offers graduate and undergraduate research opportunities in four major thrust areas: Analytical and Environmental Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Organic and Natural Products Chemistry and Physical and Theoretical Chemistry. Our four-year BSc Majors, Minors, and two-year Master’s degrees are recognized regionally as well as globally as many of our students transfer abroad for further studies both at the undergraduate and the graduate levels where they perform exceptionally. PhD graduates of the Department of Chemistry have found employment in academia and industry both locally, regionally and internationally. There is a tremendous sense of excitement in both teaching and research in the Department of Chemistry at UB.

 

The Department of Chemistry has maintained a tradition of excellent quality in its instrument facilities through major investments by the University. Graduate courses, training for researchers in the proper use of the equipment and access to this instrumentation are readily available.  Faculty from other African states come to our department to utilize the range of instrumentation we have. In short, our facilities continue to be amongst the best and most accessible in Africa. The Department hosts a number of local, regional and international research networks. Locally we are hosts to the Centre for Scientific Research Indigenous Knowledge & Innovation (CESRIKI). Regionally UB Chemistry Department is proud to host Southern and Eastern African Network for Analytical Chemists (SEANAC), and Natural Products Research Network for Eastern and Central Africa – Botswana (NAPRECA-B).

 

The department is located in the University of Botswana Main campus in Gaborone Block 237. The Department of Chemistry is a vibrant place to study and do research in the chemical sciences.  The quality of our faculty, the quality of our facilities and the strong links between our department and other departments and programs means that our department is one of the best departments in Africa to do productive research and gain hands-on access to modern instrumentation.  Explore our web site (http://www.ub.bw/chemistry/contents/Index.html) and take the virtual tour of our department.  I strongly suggest that you take the opportunity to visit our department and take a guided tour of our Research and Teaching facilities.

 

 

Dr R. Mapitse

Head, Department of Chemistry

Tel: (267) 355 2491/2/4

Fax: (267) 355 4578

E-mail: gabaitsr@mopip.ub.bw

 

 

 

 1.0 INTRODUCTION

The Department of Chemistry in presenting its Handbook for 2015 /16 is proud to enumerate the activities and initiatives in which we are engaged in pursuit of the achievement of our mission and goals. The plan is to consolidate and enhance our all-round performance in the coming years.

 

The mission statement of the Department is as follows:

 

            The Department of Chemistry of the University of Botswana has the primary mission of producing the future scientists of Botswana in the chemical sciences. This shall be accomplished through the attainment of excellence in teaching, research and research training and shall be reinforced by the establishment of strong professional alliances with appropriate bodies and practising chemists within and outside Botswana.

 

Our goals are

 

*          to achieve a national, regional, and international reputation for excellence in the teaching and learning of chemistry and the chemical sciences

 

*          to establish a vibrant programme of research and research training focussed on the natural resources of Botswana.

 

*          to acquire a reputation within Botswana and in the region for providing excellent professional service and advice to all the Department's clients.

 

These goals find more immediate expression in the objectives we have set in our teaching and learning, our research, and our professional service.

 

1.1   In June 1999 Council decided to restructure the academic programmes of the University of Botswana and adopt the semester system. Introduction of the semester system according to the given guidelines necessitated a re-examination of the entire chemistry programmes including the incorporation of General Education Courses.  The Department also seized this opportunity to update and modernize the curriculum as well as introduce new courses to improve the quality and relevance of the teaching of chemical sciences in Botswana.

1.2   Chemistry is a unique subject, which forms a bridge between the physical and the life sciences.  The teaching of chemistry cannot be effective without mastering of significant amounts of mathematics and physics, much more than either of these latter disciplines requires from chemistry.  The Department has now developed a curriculum that will enable the training of undergraduates to qualify for a Bachelors degree in the single subject of chemistry, and a bachelor’s degree with a major in chemistry and a major or a minor in one other science subject. It also offers a minor programme in chemistry.  Furthermore it has also developed service courses for Home Economics and Nursing Education programmes.

 

1.3   The present curriculum is, through the Single Major programme in chemistry, intended to produce chemists that will lay the foundation for the future of chemical science in Botswana.  The Chemistry Major, "Second subject" Major or Minor programme, likewise is intended to blend two science subjects with a decisive knowledge in chemistry and a respectable mastery of a second subject.  The Department believes that such graduates are equipped with sufficient skills and knowledge in chemistry.  They will also be able to serve in their minor specialty in such capacities as teachers in lower secondary and elementary schools.

 

1.4    Career Opportunities in Chemistry

 

Many opportunities are available for chemists in Botswana.  Besides teaching in schools, chemists find jobs in industry as quality control and process chemists.  Quality control is not entirely restricted to industry as it is an important function of pharmaceutical companies, government laboratories, such as Department of Water Affairs, Police Labs (Forensic), etc.  Concern for environment is particularly important for Botswana and surrounding countries.  Effluents that come across political boundaries via water as well as air can easily contaminate even pristine environments.  Therefore, monitoring the environment is an important task that chemists are often involved in. Mineral rich countries like Botswana utilize bulk chemicals in mining operations and thus chemists have vital roles in keeping the quality of the environment.  Opportunities also exist for chemists to consider self-employment.  Many chemists with entrepreneurial skills can venture into starting their own manufacturing enterprises as well as setting their own analytical laboratories.

 

Career prospects in chemistry are so wide and varied that many students of the subject often fail to appreciate the possibility of utilising their knowledge of chemistry to enhance their prospects in certain professions.  While the career awareness of most students of chemistry is growing rapidly, especially as no one is

now guaranteed employment on graduation, the tendency is still to look to conventional jobs in the areas of teaching, government service (analytical laboratories) and industry.  And even within these three large fields can be found an amazing variety of job prospects for chemistry students. The prospective secondary level teacher can pursue either the B.Sc. degree or the B.Ed. (Science) degree programme. The B.Ed. (Science) degree equips prospective secondary level teacher with adequate knowledge of the subject matter.  However to enjoy a fuller range of opportunities in secondary level teaching, it is advisable that a B.Sc. (Science) graduate undergoes professional training by completing a Postgraduate Diploma in Education course (P.G.D.E) in the Faculty of Education.  Students who take the B.Ed. (Science) degree receive adequate training both in chemistry as well as in Education during their undergraduate studies.  Serious shortage of science graduates in the teaching profession means that rapid career progression is a common feature for the relatively few science graduates in this field.

 

Tertiary level teaching in the University requires postgraduate training, leading ultimately to specialisation in one of the several branches of Chemistry.  The normal requirement is a Ph.D degree in order to be adequately trained to plan and execute research projects independently.  It is possible for academic departments to employ staffs who are engaged only in research.  Such research fellows can make an invaluable contribution to the academic development of the departments.  The Chemistry Department in the University of Botswana has reached a stage where it is considering the modification of the profile of its establishment to include research fellows.

 

Professional chemists in government service are often engaged as public analysts, forensic scientists and standards officers.  Other government chemists supply laboratory services for field workers in geology, agriculture and environmental agencies.  Among other functions, a government chemist is often concerned with ensuring compliance with legal requirements for public health and safety.  The professional government chemist should have high quality specialised postgraduate training in analytical chemistry. With the Chemistry Department in a position to offer such advanced training, the opportunity exists for conserving scarce national funds.

 

There is a high demand for graduate chemists in industry.  This demand is not very obvious in Botswana at the moment because of the present low level of industrialisation in the country.  However, with the current high rate of development the need for trained chemists in industry will soon be felt.  Students of chemistry should therefore start gearing themselves for careers in industry.  Careers in industry can be as diverse as management, quality control, research and development, marketing, products formulation and testing.

 

The graduate chemist who opts for a career in industry must be prepared to learn and to adapt quickly to industrial conditions, since such conditions are often very different from university conditions.  For example, for the same product, industrial chemical reactions can be very different from academic laboratory reactions. Fortunately the industry is aware of these differences and new graduate employees are often given ample opportunities for training.

 

Whichever career the graduate chemist opts for, he or she will rise through the ranks with time.  At the top of the scale is often management.  One can acquire some managerial skills as one rises through the ranks.  However, in our modern setting, more and more businesses, parastatals, universities, etc., are looking for professionally trained personnel in management.  Management, like other professions, has many departments, some of which are production management, legal, personnel financial (accounting and auditing), publicity management and so forth.  A good knowledge of a science discipline like chemistry in addition to one to two years professional training in any of the above areas in management will be an invaluable asset to private businesses, government, parastatals etc.  Indeed, management has now become a very attractive profession to science graduates in the industrialised countries.

 

The information here certainly does not exhaust the career possibilities for the prospective chemistry graduate.  For instance, recent rapid advances in computer and information technology have had a massive impact on chemistry in academia and in industry.  It is hoped that the information here will spur on the prospective chemistry graduate to find out more about career prospects in chemistry.

 

Programme Enrolment Targets for  2012-13, 2013-14, 2014-15 & 2015-16 (Estimated)

 

Programme

Level

2012/13                  

2013/14

2014-15

2015-16

B.Sc/BEd(Sc)

100

1200              

1500

1500

1500

B.Sc/BEd(Sc)

200

400              

500

  600

  550

Combined Major

300

150               

200

  250

  300

Single Major

300

40                

45

    50

    60

Combined Major

400

50                

55

    60

    75

Single Major

400

35               

40

    35

    40


2.0       Qualification titles

The Department of Chemistry offers the following programmes, leading to the indicated degree for each.

 

2.1      Single Major programme leading to a Bachelor of Science Degree (BSc) in Chemistry,

2.2       A combined Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Chemistry and a Major or minor in another science subject (to be specified, e.g. Chemistry Major and Biology Major, or Chemistry Major and Biology Minor, etc.)

 

3.0       Programme Objectives

3.1       To train qualified chemists at different levels in order to meet the human resource needs of Botswana and to contribute to the fulfillment of vision 2016

3.2       To provide an environment for students to enable them to acquire knowledge and to learn the skills of chemistry

3.3       To produce chemists that will lay the foundation of the future chemical science for the country

3.4       To offer opportunities for students to learn the science of chemistry and to equip them with knowledge and skills in the subject.

3.5       To work with other units and departments of the university in order to produce well rounded scientists for the future development of Botswana

 

4.0        Requirements for progression into undergraduate chemistry programmes

To progress into the chemistry programmes students must, in addition to fulfilling the Faculty requirements for progression from Year I to Year II, fulfill the following requirements:

4.1       Have a minimum average grade of C+ in the two 100 level chemistry courses CHE 101 and 102 to be eligible for the Single Major programme.

4.2       Have a minimum average grade of C in the two 100 level chemistry courses to be eligible for the Chemistry Major program.

4.3       Have a minimum average grade of C- in the two 100 level chemistry courses to be eligible for the Chemistry Minor programme.

 

5.0       Assessments and Examination

The course work shall be continuously assessed throughout the duration. Continuous assessment shall consist of written tests, assignments and/or laboratory exercises. There shall be formal examination of all courses taken in each semester. The ratio between continuous assessment and formal examination marks shall be in the range of 50:50.  Final examinations for 3 credit courses shall be 3 hours long, 2 hours for 2 credit courses etc.

 

6.0       Programme Outline/Structures

6.1       Undergraduate Programmes

6.1.1    Common First Year Programme

Two general chemistry courses, CHE 101 and CHE 102, each consisting of 3 credits lectures and a 1- credit lab, will be offered to the common  programme for first year science students.

 

6.1.2    The Single Major Programme

In the Single Major Programme, students take 85 credits of core courses, 20 credits of General Education courses, and will have opportunities to select more credits from a range of optional and elective courses.  Eleven (11) credits of each Mathematics and Physics courses , are included in the core credits.

 

ENTRY TO SINGLE MAJOR PROGRAMME IS BY APPLICATION TO HOD

 

6.1.3    The Chemistry Major, Second Science Subject Major or Minor Programme

Students in the combined degree programme with Major in chemistry, in addition to the 34 credits taken in Year one, must complete a minimum of 47 credits in chemistry, a minimum of 3 credits each in mathematics and physics, and 12 credits in General Education courses.   Students must also meet the requirements for the second Major or Minor as specified by the appropriate department.

 

6.1.4    The Chemistry Minor Programme

Students in the Combined degree (Major/Minor) programme with minor in chemistry, in addition to the 34 credits taken in Year one , must complete 18 credits in Chemistry core courses consisting of 12 core credits in Year two, 4 core credits in Year three and 2 credits of Year three practicals.

 

6.1.5    Entry Requirements

To enter into any of the Chemistry programmes, in addition to fulfilling the faculty requirements for progression from year one to year two, students must also have the following.

(a)   For entry into the SINGLE MAJOR PROGRAMME, a student must obtain a minimum of C+ average in the level 200 chemistry courses including lab courses with no less than a C grade in any of these courses.

 

(b)  For entry into the CHEMISTRY MAJOR/MAJOR PROGRAMME, a

       student  must obtain a minimum of C average in the level 200 chemistry

       courses including lab courses with no less than a C- grade in any of these

       courses.

 

6.2 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES OFFERED IN

      DIFFERENT SEMESTERS

 

COMMON FIRST YEAR PROGRAMME

Semester 1

CHE101 General Chemistry I (4 credits)

MAT111 Introductory Mathematics I (4 credits)

PHY112 Geometrical optics and Mechanics. (4 credits)

COM141 Introduction to Communication and Academic Literacy Skills (Science)

 (3 credits).

ICT121            Computing Skills Fundamentals 1 ( 2 credits)

 

Service Courses

CHE107 Chemistry Applied to Family and Consumer Sciences (3 credits)

CHE109 Introductory Chemistry for BNS (3 credits)

 

Recommended Electives

ECO111 Basic Microeconomics (3 credits)

MGT100 Principles of Management (3 credits)

 

Semester 2

CHE102 General Chemistry II (4 credits) (Pre-req CHE101)

MAT122 Introductory Mathematics II (4 credits)

PHY122 Electricity, Magnetism and Elements of Modern Physics (4 credits)

COM142 Academic and Professional Communication (Science) (3 Credits)

ICT 122 Computing Skills fundamentals 2 ( 2 credits)

 

Recommended Electives

ACC100 Introduction. to Accounting (3 credits)

ECO112 Basic Macroeconomics (3 credits)

MKT100 Principles of Marketing (3 credits)

 

 

CHEMISTRY AS SINGLE MAJOR PROGRAMME

 

Semester 3

Core Courses

CHE211 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre req CHE 101 &

                CHE102)

CHE213 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit) (Pre req CHE 101 & CHE

102 ,Co-req CHE 211)

CHE232 Structure and Survey of Functional Groups I (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE 101

 & CHE102)

CHE234 Organic Chem. Lab I (1 credit) (Pre-req CHE 101 & CHE 102) ,Co-req

 CHE 232)

MAT291 Engineering Mathematics I (3 credits)

PHY231/232. Mechanics, Vibrations & waves , Physical Optics (3 credits)/ properties

     of  Matter, Basic thermodynamics and introduction to Nuclear physics          (3 credits)

 

Semester 4

Core Courses

CHE221 Atomic Structure, Bonding and Main Group Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-

                req  CHE 101 &CHE102)

CHE223 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit) (Pre req CHE 101 & CHE

 102 ,Co-req CHE221)

CHE242 Introductory Physical Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE 101`&

 CHE102, MAT122)

CHE244 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit) (Pre-req CHE 101 & CHE

 102 , Co-req CHE242)

 

Semester 5

Core Courses

CHE311 Separation Techniques (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE211)

CHE321 Coordination Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE221.)

CHE323 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit) (Pre req CHE 223, Co-req

 CHE321)

CHE331 Structure and Survey of Functional Groups II (3 credits) (Pre-req

                CHE232)

CHE341 Applications of Thermodynamics and Electrochemistry (2 credits) (Pre

-req CHE 242)

CHE343 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit) (Pre-req CHE 242 & CHE

 244)

CHE351 Chemical Informatics (1 credit)

 

Recommended Electives

BIO307 Biochemistry (3 credits)

PHY353 Mathematical Methods of Physics I (3 credits)

 

Semester 6

CHE312 Analytic Spectroscopy (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE311)

CHE314 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit) (Pre-req CHE 311, Co req

               CHE312)

CHE322 Group Theory and Organometallic Chemistry (3 credits) (Pre-req

                CHE321)

CHE332 Physical Organic Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE232 & CHE 331)

CHE334 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1credit) (Pre-req CHE234 &

CHE  331)

CHE342 Quantum Chemistry & its Applications (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE242)

CHE352 Literature based project (1 credit) (Pre-req CHE351+ all 200 level courses +

at least one section at 300 level in which student intends to carry out the literature survey))(For Chemistry major only)

 

Semester 7

Core Courses

CHE411 Advanced Analytical Techniques (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE311&

                CHE312)

CHE421 Advanced Transition Metal Chemistry (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE322)

CHE 431 Heterocyclic Chemistry, Synthetic Reactions and Design of Organic

                 Synthesis  (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE331 & CHE 332)

CHE441 Advanced Physical Chemistry I (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE341)

 

Optional Courses: Take at least ONE course from the following

 

CHE413 Advanced Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (2 credits) (Pre-req

                CHE311, CHE312 &CHE 314)

CHE423 Advanced Inorganic Laboratory (2 credits) (Pre req CHE 323 , Co-req

            CHE421)

CHE433 Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE334)

CHE443 Physical Chemistry Laboratory III (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE343)

CHE446 Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE341 &

               CHE342)

Recommended Elective

PHY472 Statistical Mechanics (3 credits)

PHY 473 Solid State Physics (3 credits)

 

Semester 8

Core Course

CHE452 Student Research Project (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE352)

 

Optional Courses: Take at least 9 Credits from the following

 

CHE412 Sample Handling & Biochemical Analysis (3 credits)-core (Pre-req

               CHE311 & CHE312)

CHE416 Environmental Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE311 and CHE312),

Co req CHE 412

CHE418 Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE311

                 &CHE312)

CHE422 Advanced Organo-metallic and Solid State Chemistry (3 credits) (Pre-req

                CHE322)

CHE426 Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE322)

CHE432 Secondary Metabolites and Biomolecules (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE331&

 CHE 332)

CHE436 Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE331)

CHE442 Advanced Physical Chemistry II (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE341)

CHE470 Excited State Chemistry (2 credits)

 

CHEMISTRY AS MAJOR SUBJECT IN COMBINED DEGREE

Semester 3

Core Courses

CHE211 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE 101 &

 CHE102)

CHE213 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit) (Pre req CHE 101 & CHE

 102 ,Co-req CHE211)

CHE232 Structure and Survey of Functional Groups I (2 credits) (Pre-req

               CHE 101 & CHE102)

CHE234 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit) (Co –req CHE 232)

MAT291 Engineering Mathematics (3 credits)

PHY231/232. Mechanics, Vibrations & waves , Physical Optics (3 credits)/ properties

                       of  Matter, Basic thermodynamics and introduction to Nuclear physics      

                       (3 credits)

Semester 4

Core Courses

CHE221 Atomic Structure, Bonding and Main Group Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-

                Req CHE 101 & CHE102)

CHE223 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit) (Pre req CHE 101 & CHE

 102 ,Co-req CHE221)

CHE242 Introductory Physical Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE 101 &

 CHE102, MAT122)

CHE244 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit) (Pre req CHE 101 & CHE 102

 ,Co-req CHE242)

 

Semester 5

Core Courses

CHE311 Separation Techniques (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE211)

CHE321 Coordination Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE221)

CHE323 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory II (1credit) (Pre req CHE 223 ,Co-req

 CHE321)

CHE331 Structure and Survey of Functional Groups II (3 credits) (Pre-req

               CHE 232)

CHE341 Applications of Thermodynamic and Electrochemistry (2 credits) (Pre-

                req CHE242)

CHE343 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit) (Pre-req CHE242 & CHE

 244)

CHE351 Chemical Informatics (1 credit)

 

Recommended Electives

BIO307 Biochemistry (3 credits)

PHY353 Mathematical Methods of Physics I (3 credits)

 

Semester 6

CHE312 Analytical Spectroscopy (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE 311)

CHE314 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit) (Pre-req CHE 311, Co

 req CHE 312)

CHE322 Group Theory and Organometallic Chemistry (3 credits) (Pre-req

                CHE321)

CHE332 Physical Organic Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE232 & CHE 331)

CHE334 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit) (Pre-req CHE234 & CHE

 331)

CHE352 Literature based project (1 credit) ((Pre-req: CHE351+ all 200 level courses

+ atleast one section at 300 level in which student intends to carry out the

 literature survey) (For Chemistry major only)

 

Semester 7

 

Optional Courses: Take at least 6 Credits from the following

 

CHE411 Advanced Analytical Techniques (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE311&

                CHE312)

CHE421 Advanced Transition Metal Chemistry (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE322)

CHE431 Heterocyclic Chemistry, Synthetic Reactions and Design of Organic

                 Synthesis  (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE331 & CHE 332)

CHE441 Advanced Physical Chemistry I (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE341)

 

Semester 8

Core Course

CHE342 Quantum Chemistry & its Applications (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE242)

CHE334 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit) (Pre-req CHE234 &CHE

 331)

CHE452 Student Research Project (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE352)

 

Recommended Elective

ENS402 Natural Resources Management  and Economics (3 credits)

 

CHEMISTRY AS MINOR SUBJECT IN COMBINED DEGREE

 

Semester 3

Core Courses

CHE211 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE 101

 &CHE102)

CHE213 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit) (Pre req CHE 101 & CHE

 102 ,Co-req CHE211)

CHE232 Structure & Survey of Functional Groups I (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE 101

 & CHE102)

CHE234 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit) (Co- req CHE 232)

 

Semester 4

Core Courses

CHE221 Atomic Structure, Bonding and Main Group Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-

                req CHE 101 & CHE102)

CHE223 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit) (Pre req CHE 101 & CHE

 102 ,Co-req CHE221)

CHE242 Introductory Physical Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE 101 &

 CHE102, MAT122)

CHE244 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I (1 credit) (Pre req CHE 101 & CHE 102

 , Co-req CHE242)

 

Required to take at least 6 Credits including 2 Credits of Laboratory courses from the CHE Courses in Semester 5 and 6

 

Semester 5

CHE311 Separation Techniques (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE211)

CHE321 Coordination Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE221)

CHE323 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit) (Pre req CHE 223, Co-req

 CHE321)

CHE331 Structure and Survey of Functional Groups II (3 credits) (Pre-req

               CHE232)

CHE341 Applications of Thermodynamic and Electrochemistry (2 credits) (Pre-

                req CHE242)

CHE343 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit) (Pre-req CHE242 & CHE

 244)

CHE351 Chemical Informatics (1 credit)

 

Semester 6

CHE312 Analytic Spectroscopy (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE311)

CHE314 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit), (Pre-req CHE311 ,

 Co req CHE 312)

CHE322 Group Theory and Organometallic Chemistry (3 credits) (Pre-req

                CHE321)

CHE332 Physical Organic Chemistry (2 credits) (Pre-req CHE232 & CHE 331)

CHE334 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1 credit) (Pre-req CHE234 & CHE

 331)

CHE342 Quantum Chemistry and Applications (3 credits) (Pre-req CHE242 )

 

Recommended Electives

BIO308 Molecular Biology (3 credits)

MGT303 Entrepreneurship and New Business Formations (3 credits)

 

Semester 7

Not required to take any Chemistry courses.

 

Semester 8

Not required to take any Chemistry courses.

 

Recommended Electives

ENS402  Natural Resources Management and Economics (3 credits)

 

6.2.1    Assessment and Examination

The coursework shall be continuously assessed. Continuous assessment shall consist of written tests, assignments and laboratory exercises where applicable. The weighting of final examination where applicable, shall not be less than 50% of the overall grade for a given course.

 

6.2.2    Progression from one Semester to the next Semester

Progression from one semester to the next shall be as per General Regulations 00.9

 

6.2.3    Award of Degree

The award of the degree shall be as per General Regulations 00.852

Template for undergraduate degree programme

 

Single Major

Major in Chemistry

Minor in Chemistry

            Level 100

CHE 101 (4 credits)

CHE 102 (4 credits)

                           

                      [8 credits]

          Level 100

CHE 101 (4 credits)

CHE 102 (4 credits)

                                  

                      [8 credits]

          Level 100

CHE 101 (4 credits)

CHE 102 (4 credits)

                                 

                         [8 credits]

            Level 200

CHE 211/3 (3 credits)

CHE 221/3 (3 credits)

CHE 232/4 (3 credits)

CHE 242/4 (3 credits)

                           

                    [12 credits]

           Level 200

CHE 211/3 (3 credits)

CHE 221/3 (3 credits)

CHE 232/4 (3 credits)

CHE 242/4 (3 credits)

                              

                    [12 credits]

          Level 200

CHE 211/3 (3 credits)

CHE 221/3 (3 credits)

CHE 232/4 (3 credits)

CHE 242/4 (3 credits)

                                 

                       [12 credits]

            Level 300

CHE311 

(3 credits)

CHE321/3

(3 credits)

CHE331   

(3 credits)

CHE341/3

(3 credits)

CHE351   

(1 credit)

CHE312/4

(3 credits)

CHE322 

(3 credits)

CHE332/4

(3 credits)

CHE 342   

(3 credits)

CHE 352   

(1 credit)

  [26 credits]     

 

 

           Level 300

CHE311 (3 credits)

CHE321/3 (3 credits)

CHE341/3  (3 credit)

CHE351   (1 credits)

CHE312/4  (3 credits)

CHE322  (3 credits)

CHE332/4 (3 credit)

CHE352 (1 credits)

CHE331 (3 credits)

 

[23 credits]

 

      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

            Level 300

Take at least 6 credits including 2 credits of labo- ratory from the Chemistry courses in semester 5 and 6.

 CHE 311 (3 credits)

CHE321/3 (3 credits)

CHE331    (3 credits)

CHE341/3 (3 credits)

CHE351    (1 credit)

CHE312/4 (3 credits)

CHE 322   (3 credits)

CHE332/4 (3 credits)

CHE342   (3 credits)

 

That’s the minimum chemistry you need! You may do more if you wish.

 

                      

 

 [6 credits]

Level 400

CHE 411 (3 credits)

CHE 421 (3 credits)

CHE 431 (3 credits)

CHE 441 (3 credits)

CHE 452 (3 credits)

+ one course from the following:

CHE 413 (2 credits)

CHE 423 (2 credits)

CHE 433 (2 credits)

CHE 443 (2 credits)

CHE 446 (2 credits) +

Optional/elective courses: Take at least 9

 credits from the following

 

CHE 412 (3 credits)

CHE 416 (2 credits)

CHE 418 (2 credits)

CHE 422 (3 credits)

CHE 426 (2 credits)

CHE 432 (3 credits)

CHE 436 (2 credits)

CHE 442 ( 3 credits)

CHE 470 (2 credits)

 

                         

                 [26 credits]

 

TotalChem.[72 Credits]

 

           Level 400

CHE 342    (3 credits)

CHE 334 (1 credit)

CHE 452 (3 credits) 

+ Take at least 6 credits from the following:

CHE 411 (3 credits)

CHE 421 (3 credits)

CHE 431 (3 credits)

CHE 441 (3 credits) +

 

 

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                    

                             

           

          

                  

                 

                    [13 credits]

 

TotalChem[56 Credits]

Level 400

 

 

 

 

 

Not required to take Chemistry Courses in semester 7 and 8

 

 

 

 

 

       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                        

                         

                        [0 credits]

  

 Total Chem. [26 Credits]

 

GEC        [20 credits]

GEC        [20 credits]

GEC           [20 credits]

Core other than Chem.

 

MAT 111   

(4 credits)

MAT 122   

(4 credits)

PHY 112     

(4 credits)

PHY 122     

(4 credits)

 

Level 200

 

PHY 231/232 (3 credits)

MAT 291        (3 credits)

                         

  [22 credits]

+ Electives to make 120 credits total.

 

Core other than Chem.

 

MAT 111    (4 credits)

MAT 122    (4 credits)

PHY 112     (4 credits)

PHY 122     (4 credits)

 

Level 200

 

PHY 231/232 (3 credits)

MAT 291       (3 credits)

                           

 [22 credits]

+ Electives + requirements of other major/minor subjects to make 120 credits total.

Core other than Chem.

 

MAT 111   

(4 credits)

MAT 122   

(4 credits)

PHY 112     

(4 credits)

PHY 122      

(4 credits)

                        

 [16 credits]

+ Electives + requirements of major subject to make 120 credits total.

                         

                                  

                       

 

 

6.3 Graduate Degree Programmes in Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry started its graduate programmes in 1992, with the introduction of the Master of Science in Analytical Chemistry and Natural Products Chemistry. These were 2-year programmes by coursework and dissertation. The success and popularity of the two programmes, both in the country and in the Southern African region, led to the expansion of the Chemistry Graduate programmes in 1996 to the MPhil and PhD programmes in Analytical Chemistry and Natural Products Chemistry. The Department of Chemistry graduated its first PhD student in 1999. At the beginning of the millennium, the Department of Chemistry carried out a comprehensive review of its Graduate programmes with the principal aim of expanding its research training capacity to embrace all four traditional areas of study in Chemistry (Analytical, Inorganic, Organic and Physical Chemistry). The move by the University to change from the subject system to a semesterised system provided an added momentum for the review exercise, which cumulated in redesigning the Graduate Programmes to embrace all four traditional areas of study in Chemistry. We now run the new MSc generic programme in which all first year students take four common core courses (12 credits) during the first semester for consolidation, before proceeding to their specialization courses (12 credits) in the second semester. The Master of Science course work includes new courses from Physical and Inorganic Chemistry together with revised courses from the original Analytical and Natural Products Chemistry courses. Upon successful completion of the course work, students spend the second year on their dissertation projects in any one of the four areas of chemistry. The Department also runs four separate MPhil and PhD courses, by research and limited course work, in Analytical, Inorganic, Organic and Physical Chemistry. The Department reserves the right to prescribe Master of Science courses to newly admitted MPhil/PhD students after assessment. In addition to other Departmental requirements, students applying to transfer from the MPhil to the PhD programme may be required to pass a qualifying examination. These additional requirements are intended to ensure quality admission into the PhD programmes. The Master of Science degrees in chemistry (MSc and MPhil) have served as a springboard for young chemists aspiring to careers in academic and research institutions. About half the students who have so far graduated with the Master of Science Degree from the Chemistry Department have gone on to study for PhD Degrees in Chemistry and have been employed in academic institutions within the country and the region. The rest of the Master of Science graduates have all found employment in research laboratories again in this country and in the region.

 

6.3.1 General Provisions : Subject to the provisions of General Academic Regulations and the School of Graduate Studies Special Regulations, the following Departmental Regulations shall apply.

 

6.3.2 Qualification Titles: The Department offers the following programmes.

            •Master of Science Degree in Chemistry

•Master of Philosophy Degree in Chemistry (Analytical, Inorganic, Organic or Physical Chemistry)

•PhD Degree in Chemistry (Analytical, Inorganic, Organic or Physical Chemistry)

 

6.3.3 Programme Objectives

The objectives of the Graduate and Postgraduate Degree Programmes in Chemistry are the following

 

(a)       To train students to acquire advanced skills and knowledge in the

            chemical  sciences required by government, parastatals and the private

            sector.

(b)       To develop in students the creative flair and patience necessary to

            independently undertake and execute research work

(c)       To kindle in students the desire to investigate indigenous natural resources

            derived from plants, animals, and minerals for development.

(d)       To enhance the training capacity of the Chemistry Department by  

developing  economically and socially relevant curricula in the chemical sciences.

 

6.4 Departmental Regulations for the Master of Science  

      Degree

 

6.4.1 Entrance Requirements : To enter into any of the Master of Science degree programmes, a student must satisfy one of the following requirements:

 

(a) A Bachelor of Science Degree in Chemistry from a recognized university or

     equivalent institution of higher learning with a minimum achievement of 2.8

     GPA on a 5- point  scale.

 

(b) A Bachelor of Science Degree in Chemistry with a pass (GPA of 2-2.7 on a 5-

     point scale) from a recognized university or equivalent institution of higher

     learning. In addition, applicants must also have at least two years of relevant

     experience in Chemistry.

 

6.4.2 Programme Structure

6.4.2.1 The Master of Science

Degree programmes in chemistry are by coursework and dissertation, extending over two years, including the intervening long vacation period. The coursework is normally conducted during the first academic year and is followed by a supervised original research project extending over the second year of study.

 

6.4.2.2 Students enrolled in the Master of Science Programmes must take and normally pass 24 credits in the core and specialization courses before proceeding to the dissertation. The duration of the Master of Science Programmes shall be as stipulated in General Regulation 40.32.

 

6.5. Regulations for the M Phil and Ph D degree programmes

 

6.5.1 Entrance Requirements

6.5.1.1 To be eligible to register for the MPhil Degree in Chemistry, applicants

            must satisfy one of the following requirements.

 

(a) A Single Major or Honours Bachelor of Science Degree in Chemistry from a recognized university or equivalent institution of higher learning with a minimum

achievement of 2.8 GPA on a 5-point scale.

(b) A Combined Major Bachelor of Science Degree or allied fields in Chemistry from a recognized university or equivalent institution of higher learning with a minimum achievement of 3.6 GPA on a 5-point scale.

(c) A Master of Science Degree in Chemistry from a recognized university or equivalent institution of higher learning.

 

6.5.1.2 To be eligible to register for the PhD Degree, applicants must have a Master’s Degree in Chemistry, i.e. Master of Science or MPhil, or a Bachelor of Science Degree with minimum achievement of 3.5 GPA on a 5-point scale from a recognized university or equivalent institution of higher learning. In addition, the candidate must take and pass a qualifying examination as prescribed by the Departmental Board. In all cases the provisions of General Regulation 50.21.2 shall apply.

6.5.2 Programme Structure

6.5.2.1 MPhil and PhD

Degrees shall normally consist of seminar(s), research work and thesis. The duration of the MPhil and PhD Programmes shall be in accordance with General Regulations 50.41.1 and 50.41.2.

6.5.2.2 In addition to the provisions of General Regulation 50.12, the following departmental regulations shall apply.

(a) A candidate may be required to undergo a Departmental assessment and evaluation in order to determine whether or not he/she is qualified to undertake the MPhil or PhD Programme of study. On the basis of this assessment and evaluation, a candidate may be required to register and pass some or all of the Master of Science courses currently offered by the Department;

(b) All MPhil and PhD candidates shall be required to register for seminar topics chosen from CHE801 through CHE808. The topics chosen shall not be related

to, but shall be in support of the candidate’s programme of research work

(c) Each seminar in courses CHE801 through CHE808 consists of a written report on a directed study of a selected topic as well as a presentation of a seminar to a sectional Committee/ Departmental Board. The study shall be carried out under the supervision of a member of staff and the Departmental Board shall assess the report.

(d) M.Phil candidates shall be  required to achieve satisfactory performance in one seminar. PhD candidates shall be required to achieve satisfactory performance in two seminars.

(e) In addition to the seminar presentations of courses CHE 801 through CHE 808, all candidates shall be required to make two formal oral presentations on their research. The first oral presentation shall be made midway through the research and the second presentation shall be made at the end of the research project , before submission of the thesis.

 

6.5.2.3            Transfer of Registration

 

Transfer from M Phil to PhD or from PhD to M Phil shall be permitted in accordance with the provisions of General regulations 50.43 and 50.43.2 respectively. In addition to the above provisions, a candidate requesting transfer from M Phil to Ph D programme must satisfy the following Departmental Requirements.

 

(a)   Candidates must achieve satisfactory performance in both the oral presentation and written report in one of the seminar courses (CHE 801 through CHE 808) as assessed by the Departmental Board or a sectional committee constituted by it.

(b)       Candidates must achieve satisfactory performance in both the  presentation and the written report on his/her research project, as assessed by the Departmental Board or a sectional committee constituted by it, normally with in 9 to 24 months from the date of initial registration. The degree candidate may also be required to pass a qualifying examination as prescribed by the Departmental Board.

 

SEMESTER 9

6.5.3 Course Listings

Master of Science Common Core Courses.

CHE651 Separation Science and Spectrometry (3 credits)

CHE621 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3 credits)

CHE631 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3 credits)

CHE641 Advanced Physical Chemistry (3 credits)

 

SEMESTER 10

Semester 10

4.1 Analytical Chemistry Core Courses

 

CHE653 Electro analytical Chemistry (3 credits)

CHE655 Process Instrumentation and Sample Handling (3 credits) Pre –req CHE 651

CHE657 Chemometrics (3 credit) Pre-req CHE 651

Optional Courses

CHE652 Analytical Spectrometry (3 credits) Pre-req CHE 651)

CHE656 Applications of Analytical Chemistry (3 credits) Pre req CHE 651

CHE654 Hyphenated Techniques  (3 credits) Pre req (CHE 651)

CHE658 Special Techniques in Analytical (3credits ) (Pre req CHE 651)

 

6.5.5 Inorganic Chemistry Core Courses

CHE622 Physical Methods in Inorganic Chemistry (3 credits) (Pre-requisite

                CHE621)

CHE623 Kinetics and Mechanisms of Reactions in Transition Metal, Coordination

               and Organometallic Chemistry  (2 credits)

CHE624 Structure and Reactivity in Inorganic Chemistry (3 credits)

Optional Courses

CHE625 Chemistry of the Solid State, Metals and Semiconductors (2 credits)

CHE626 Main Group Chemistry (2 credits)

CHE627 Organometallic Chemistry in Homogeneous Catalysis and Synthesis (2

                credits)

 

6.5.6 Organic Chemistry Core Courses

CHE632 Spectroscopic Methods in Organic Chemistry (3 credits) (Pre-req.

               CHE631)

CHE634 Methods and Design of Organic Synthesis (2 credits)

CHE636 Advanced Laboratory Synthesis (2 credits)

CHE638 Introduction to the Chemistry and Biosynthesis of Natural Products (3

                credits)

 

6.5.6.1 Optional Courses

CHE630 Organic Chemistry of Primary Metabolites (2 credits)

CHE633 Organic Free Radical Chemistry and Photochemistry (2 credits)

CHE635 Polycyclic and Heterocyclic Aromatic Chemistry (2 credits)

CHE637 Advanced Organic Synthesis (2 credits)

 

6.5.7 Physical Chemistry Core Courses

CHE642 Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy (3 credits)

CHE644 Interfacial Phenomena  (3 credits) (Pre-requisite CHE641)

 

6.5.7.1 Optional Courses

 

CHE646 Polymer Chemistry  (3 credits)

CHE648 Advanced Chemical Kinetics (3 credits)

CHE649 Diffraction Methods  (3 credits)

 

Students may take optional courses from any of the four sections of Chemistry. Optional courses may also be taken from other Faculty Departments at the appropriate level, by permission of the Chemistry Board and by the department offering the course.

 

6.6 MPhil and PhD Courses (2 credits each)

 

CHE801 Seminar Topics in Analytical Chemistry

CHE802 Seminar Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

CHE803 Seminar Topics in Organic  Chemistry

CHE804 Seminar Topics in Physical  Chemistry

CHE903 Seminar Topics in Analytical Chemistry

CHE904 Seminar Topics in Inorganic Chemistry  

CHE807 Seminar Topics in Organic Chemistry  

CHE808 Seminar Topics in Physical Chemistry

 

6.7 Dissertation and Thesis

CHE751 Supervised Research & Dissertation in Analytical Chemistry (MSc) (24

                credits)

CHE752 Supervised Research and Dissertation in Inorganic Chemistry (MSc)

 (24 credits)

CHE753 Supervised Research and Dissertation in Organic Chemistry (MSc)

(24 credits)

CHE754 Supervised Research and Dissertation in Physical Chemistry (MSc)

(24 credits)

CHE851 Supervised Research and Thesis in Analytical Chemistry (MPhil)

(48 credits)

CHE852 Supervised Research and Thesis in Inorganic Chemistry (MPhil)

 (48 credits)

CHE853 Supervised Research and Thesis in Organic Chemistry (MPhil)

(48 credits)

CHE854 Supervised Research and Thesis in Physical Chemistry (MPhil)

(48  credits)

CHE951 Supervised Research and Thesis in Analytical Chemistry (PhD)

(72 credits)

CHE952 Supervised Research and Thesis in Inorganic Chemistry (PhD)

(72 credits)

CHE953 Supervised Research and Thesis in Organic Chemistry (PhD) (72 credits)

 

CHE954 Supervised Research and Thesis in Physical Chemistry (PhD) (72 credits)

 

6.8 Assessment and Examination

 

6.8.1 The coursework shall be continuously assessed. Continuous assessment shall consist of written tests, assignments, seminar-type presentations on assigned materials, laboratory exercises, etc. There shall be a formal examination of all courses taken in each semester. The ratio between continuous assessment and formal examination marks shall be 1:1.

 

6.8.2 The examination of dissertations and theses shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions of General Regulations 50.50 through 50.61.4.

 

7.0  Course Takings (Tentative)

7.1 Semester I 2013/14

7.1.1    Undergraduate

 

Level

 

Course

 

Credits

 

Estimated No. of Students

 

Instructors /Lecturers

 

 

100

 

CHE 101

 

CHE 101

CHE 102 (off semester)

CHE 107

CHE 107 Pr

CHE 109

CHE 109 Pr

 

4

 

Lab

4

 

2

1

2

1

 

1500

 

1500

100

 

60

60

05

05

 

Dr. Kumar, Dr Oyetunji

 

All Staff

 

 

Prof Ahmad

 

Prof Ahmad

 

200

 

CHE 211

CHE 213 Pr

 

CHE232

CHE234 

 

2

1

 

2

1

 

 

200               

200

 

162

162

 

Dr. Takuwa

Dr Takuwa, Dr Obuseng,

 

 Prof.  Yeboah

 Prof. Yeboah,

Prof Singh, Dr. Mapitse

Prof Majinda

 

 

300

 

CHE311

CHE321

CHE323 

CHE331

CHE341

CHE343

CHE351

 

 

2

2

1

3

3

1

1

 

 

22

40

35

30

30

30

35

 

 

 

Dr Munyaneza, Dr Nnyepi

All staff (Inog. Section).

 

Dr Ddamba, 

Dr Mokoena Dr Nadiye

Dr Nareetsile

400

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHE411

CHE 418

CHE413

CHE421

CHE423 

CHE431

CHE433

CHE441

CHE443

 

3

 

2

3

2

3

2

3

2

 

30

 

35

30

05

35

10

10

17

 

Dr. Obuseng

 

 

Dr Munyaneza, Dr Mapolelo

All Inog. Chem. staff

Dr Mapitse, Prof. Masesane

Prof. Masesane

Dr Ddamba,

Prof Ahmad,,Dr Ddamba

Dr Mokoena

 

7.1.2    Graduate

600 (I)

CHE651

CHE621

CHE631

CHE641

3

3

3

3

5

5

5

5

 

Dr Mapolelo, Dr Oyetunji

Prof..Yeboah

Drs Ddamba,  Nadiye

 

7.2 Course Takings – Semester II 20012/13

7.2.1    Undergraduate

 

Level

 

Course

 

Credits

 

Estimated No.of Students

 

Lecturers

 

100

CHE 102

 

CHE 101 (off semester)

 

4

 

4

 

800

 

150

Prof Ahmad , Prof Majinda Dr Mokoena

Dr Takuwa

 

 

200

 

CHE 221

CHE223 

CHE242

CHE244 

 

2

1

2

1

 

200

170

190

180

 

Dr Oyetunji, Dr Nnyepi

All staff (Inoganic Section)

,Dr Mokoena

Dr Ddamba, Dr Mokoena, Dr Nadiye

 

300

 

CHE 312

CHE 314

CHE 322

CHE 332

CHE 334 

CHE 342

CHE 352

 

 2

1

3

2

1

3

1

 

22

22

40

30

30

30

30

 

Dr. Takuwa , Dr Nkoane

Dr Obuseng, Dr Nkoane

Dr Mapolelo, Dr. Kumar

Prof.Yeboah

Prof.Yeboah,

Dr Mokoena, Dr Nadiye

Dr Nkoane

 

400

CHE 412

CHE 418

CHE 422

CHE 432

CHE 442

CHE 452

3

2

3

3

3

3

5

5

5

5

5

5

Dr. Obuseng

Dr Nkoane

Dr. Nareetsile, Dr Tshabang Prof Singh

Dr Ddamba, Dr Nadiye

All Staff

 

 

7.2.2    Graduate

 

Level

Course

Credits

Estimated

No. of students

Instructors / Lectures

 

 

600 (II)

CHE651

CHE652

CHE653

CHE654

CHE655

CHE616

 

CHE622

CHE623

CHE624

CHE 625

CHE 626

CHE 627

CHE632

CHE 633

CHE634

CHE636

CHE638

CHE642

CHE644

CHE646

CHE648

3

3

3

3

3

3

 

3

2

3

2

2

2

3

2

2

2

3

3

3

3

3

5

5

5

5

5

5

 

2

2

2

 

 

 

5

5

5

5

5

2

2

2

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Mapolelo Dr Nnyepi

Dr. Oyetunji , Dr. Kumar

Dr.Munyaneza, Dr Tshabang,

 

Dr Tshabang, Dr Nareetsile

Dr Munyaneza, Dr Nareetsile

Prof Masesane

ProfMasesane

Prof. Singh , Dr. Mapitse

Prof. Singh

Prof. Majinda

Dr . Mokoena

Dr Mokoena,Dr Nadiye

Dr Ddamba, Dr Mbaiwa

Dr Kabomo,Dr Nadiye

 

8.0       COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

8.1       Year I

 

CHE 101 – General Chemistry I (4 credits; 3 lectures, 1lab/tutorial)

Credits

4

Type (core, optional/general)

Core

Semester in which the course is taught

1

 

Aims and Learning Objectives:

 

Students will be introduced to the fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry with emphasis on the structure of matter.  The course aims to help students develop their problem-solving skills and to appreciate the quantitative as well as qualitative aspects of chemistry.  The connection between the principles of chemistry and the familiar examples from everyday life will be established during the study of each topic, wherever appropriate.

 

Intended Learning Outcome

 

By the end of the course the students would have an understanding of the basic principles of chemistry; how physical and chemical properties of elements and the periodicity of these properties relate to the atomic structure; what determines the bonding between atoms to form molecules; and how the molecular structure determines properties of matter.

 

Course Synopsis:

 

Composition of matter, elements, nomenclature of compounds, measurements and units, the mole, reaction stochiometry, precipitation reactions, acid-base and redox reactions, limiting reagents, properties of gases, molecular motion, structure of the atom, periodicity of atomic properties, electronic structure and the periodic table, chemical bonding, molecular geometry.

 

The laboratory component of the course will include experiments on stoichiometry, limiting reagents, precipitation reactions, acid-base titrations, redox titrations and other topics covered in the theory part.

Assessment:  Continuous assessment (50%), final examination (50%)

Recommended Textbook: General Chemistry: J. Ahmad, G. Kumar, I.P.Meulenberg and G.S.Singh. Chemistry Department, University of Botswana, Private Bag UB 00704, Gaborone, Botswana. 2013.

 

CHE 102 General Chemistry II (4 credits; 3 lectures, 1 lab/tutorial)

Credits

4

Type (core, optional/general)

Core

Semester in which the course is taught

2

Pre-requisites (if any)

CHE 101

Aims and Learning Objectives:

Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles associated with properties of chemical systems.  The course will emphasise the further development of the problem-solving skills learned in CHE 101. The students will be taught to visualise quantitative aspects of the chemical systems approaching equilibrium as well as those already in a state of equilibrium.   The connection between the principles of chemistry and the familiar examples from everyday life will be established during the study of each topic, wherever appropriate.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, the students would have an understanding of the how the structure of carbon atom leads to the abundance and variety of organic compounds.  They would have understanding of how the structure of molecules and the presence of functional groups determine physical and chemical properties.  The students would have learned the role of thermal energy in chemical transformation, the principles of chemical equilibrium in gas phase as well as solutions, particularly as applied to acids and base, and the fundamentals of rate of reactions and the effect of temperature on reaction rates

 

Course Synopsis:

Chemistry of carbon compounds: hydrocarbons, functional groups, isomers, and polymers.  Thermo chemistry: Calorimetry, enthalpy of phase change, reaction enthalpies, Hess’s law, standard enthalpy of formation, solubility, Henry’s law, colligative properties, chemical equilibrium, calculations involving equilibrium constant, response of equilibrium to change, ionic equilibria, rates of reactions, rate laws, half life of reactions, temperature and rate, activation energy.

 

The laboratory component of the course will include experiments on physical and chemical properties of organic compounds, thermo chemistry, pH titrations, chemical kinetics and other topics covered in the theory part of the course.

Assessment: Continuous assessment (50%), final examination (50%)

Recommended Textbook : General Chemistry: J. Ahmad, G. Kumar, I.P.Meulenberg and G.S.Singh. Chemistry Department, University of Botswana, Private Bag UB 00704, Gaborone, Botswana. 2013.

 

CHE 107 – Chemistry Applied to Family & Consumer Sciences

       (3 credits, 2lectures, 1 lab)

 

Credits

3

Type (core, optional/general)

 

Semester in which the course is taught

1

Aims and Learning Objectives:

Students will be able to appreciate and understand the role that chemistry plays in what they do and use everyday.  The students will be guided to visualize the connection between the concepts of chemistry and their everyday lives.  Through an emphasis on the applications of chemistry, students will be given an appreciation of how chemistry affects consumers.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

 

Course Synopsis

Elements, structure of the atom, periodic table, oxidation and reduction, chemistry of carbon compounds, acids and bases, soaps and detergents, food and energy, fats, carbohydrates, proteins, minerals and vitamins, chemical additives in foods, poisons and toxins, gases, polymers and plastics, cosmetics. The laboratory component of the course will comprise experiments that illustrate the concepts covered during lectures, and have applications in everyday life.

 

Assessment: Continuous assessment (50%), final examination (50%).

Recommended Textbook: General, Organic & Biological Chemistry-Structures of Life, Karen C. Timberlake, Pearson Education International, 10th Edition, 2009

 

CHE 109 - Introductory Chemistry for BNS (3 credits:2 lectures,1 lab)

Credits

3

Type (core, optional/general)

 

Semester in which the course is taught

1

Aims and Learning Objectives:

Students will be able to understand basic aspects of chemistry that is relevant to the needs of the Bachelor of Nursing Science programme.

Intended Learning Outcomes

 

Course Synopsis:

Introduction, structure and bonding, stoichiometry, solutions, chemistry of certain elements, Electricity and chemical change, osmosis, reaction rates and catalysis, radioactivity. The laboratory component will consist of a series of 2-hour wet and/or dry lab sessions and a 1-hour tutorial.

Assessment: Continuous assessment (50%), final examination (50%)

Recommended Textbook: Chemistry for the Health Sciences, (7th Ed), Sackheim and Lehman.

 

8.2       Year II

CHE 211  - Introduction to Analytical Chemistry (2 Credits)

Credits

2

Type (core, optional/general)

Core

Semester in which the course is taught

1

Pre-requisites (if any)

CHE 101&102

Aims and Learning Objectives:

Students will be able to learn the basic principles of Analytical Chemistry. They will be introduced to concepts of classical as well as principles of modern methods

in Analytical Chemistry. Also the students will learn numerical methods to enable them to process experimental data.

 

Intended Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, students should be able to;

1.         demonstrate understanding in reporting scientific data using basic statistical  methods.

2.         calculate or deduce the volume of a solution of known concentration, which is  required to react with the analyte in titrimetry and apply simple stoichiometry relationships of chemical reactions to determine the unknown concentration for the substance/solution given.

3.         calculate concentrations of unknown solutions through formation of

            complexes, redox reactions using titrimetry.

4.         understand the formation and properties of precipitates.

5.         use precipitates in determining amount of given compounds or elements in different substances. 

Course Synopsis:

Gravimetry: principles, procedures and applications. Titrimetry: neutralization, precipitation and complexometric titrations, redox titrations, etc. Statistical treatment of analytical data: error analysis of experimental data, etc.

Assessment:  Continuous assessment (50%) and final examination (50%)

Recommended Textbook: Quantitative Chemical Analysis, D. C. Harris, (Fourth Edition)